Perl regular expression matcher online dating dating site for ugly people cnn

For example, if someone search for "ode", the [code] tags won't needed in the result list, not to mention that the syntax highlighting destroyed the html code as well :)I was only able to do it this way ($search is the search string, passed from php): SELECT * FROM table WHERE LOWER(content) LIKE '%$search%' AND content REGEXP '[\.[^\[]*$search' I wanted my $search to be found only after "]", and only if there is no "[" between them. Since character code escape sequences aren't supported, here's a handy regexp for finding any rows with characters outside of the ASCII range: SELECT * FROM my_table WHERE the_column REGEXP '[^[. DEL.]]' Alternately, if you want to exclude control characters as well: SELECT * FROM my_table WHERE the_column REGEXP '[^ -~]' For those times when you need a fast reference for regex you can download and print or view this pdf . It's quite unfortunate that their REGEX interpreter doesn't support logical NOT expressions.Ordinarily I would write something like this to match all numbers except 11:(?!latin1_general_ci) table will find any case insensetive words, even words like "upper" or "u Pp Or", or "Up POr", etc...To avoid this use one of the following Methods: SELECT * FROM table WHERE text COLLATE latin1_general_cs REGEXP '...' ORSELECT * FROM table WHERE CAST(x AS BINARY) REGEXP '...' "To use a literal instance of a special character in a regular expression, precede it by two backslash (\) characters."If you are coding in PHP and you need to match a literal backslash you can easily end up with an unmaintainable mess of \\\\\\\\'s.In Perl or PHP, you probably will write something like this to match on a line starting with a $ sign:$query = "SELECT * FROM `foo` WHERE `bar` REGEXP \"^\\\$\""I'll explain the special characters in that and what they mean:backslash, speech mark = a literal speech mark HAT sign = beginning of linetwo backslashes = a literal backslashbackslash, dollar = a literal dollar signbackslash, speech mark = a literal speech mark Now if you print $query, it will have the value SELECT * FROM `foo` WHERE `bar` REGEXP "^\$"which is what you really want, and how you would type it into the mysql command line.

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For example, if someone search for "ode", the [code] tags won't needed in the result list, not to mention that the syntax highlighting destroyed the html code as well :)I was only able to do it this way ($search is the search string, passed from php): SELECT * FROM table WHERE LOWER(content) LIKE '%$search%' AND content REGEXP '[\]].[^\[]*$search' I wanted my $search to be found only after "]", and only if there is no "[" between them. Since character code escape sequences aren't supported, here's a handy regexp for finding any rows with characters outside of the ASCII range: SELECT * FROM my_table WHERE the_column REGEXP '[^[. DEL.]]' Alternately, if you want to exclude control characters as well: SELECT * FROM my_table WHERE the_column REGEXP '[^ -~]' For those times when you need a fast reference for regex you can download and print or view this pdf . It's quite unfortunate that their REGEX interpreter doesn't support logical NOT expressions.

Ordinarily I would write something like this to match all numbers except 11:(?!

latin1_general_ci) table will find any case insensetive words, even words like "upper" or "u Pp Or", or "Up POr", etc...

To avoid this use one of the following Methods: SELECT * FROM table WHERE text COLLATE latin1_general_cs REGEXP '...' ORSELECT * FROM table WHERE CAST(x AS BINARY) REGEXP '...' "To use a literal instance of a special character in a regular expression, precede it by two backslash (\) characters."If you are coding in PHP and you need to match a literal backslash you can easily end up with an unmaintainable mess of \\\\\\\\'s.

In Perl or PHP, you probably will write something like this to match on a line starting with a $ sign:$query = "SELECT * FROM `foo` WHERE `bar` REGEXP \"^\\\$\""I'll explain the special characters in that and what they mean:backslash, speech mark = a literal speech mark HAT sign = beginning of linetwo backslashes = a literal backslashbackslash, dollar = a literal dollar signbackslash, speech mark = a literal speech mark Now if you print $query, it will have the value SELECT * FROM `foo` WHERE `bar` REGEXP "^\$"which is what you really want, and how you would type it into the mysql command line.

Remember also that PHPMy Admin expects you to put a backslash before a backslash or apostrophe.

So in PHPMy Admin you would enter SELECT * FROM `foo` WHERE `bar` REGEXP "^\\$"I guess if you only want to use .

and .* regular expressions, you may as well stick to using LIKE with the _ and % wildcards, as that is probably a bit faster. If you need anything more complicated than what's shown above, a good site to learn how to use them is

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This section does not contain all the details that can be found in Henry Spencer's To use a literal instance of a special character in a regular expression, precede it by two backslash (\) characters.

The My SQL parser interprets one of the backslashes, and the regular expression library interprets the other.

For example, to match the string PDF (US Ltr) - 38.4Mb PDF (A4) - 38.4Mb PDF (RPM) - 37.7Mb HTML Download (TGZ) - 10.3Mb HTML Download (Zip) - 10.3Mb HTML Download (RPM) - 9.0Mb Man Pages (TGZ) - 197.5Kb Man Pages (Zip) - 306.1Kb Info (Gzip) - 3.5Mb Info (Zip) - 3.5Mb My SQL Backup and Recovery My SQL Globalization My SQL Information Schema My SQL Installation Guide My SQL and Linux/Unix My SQL and OS X My SQL Partitioning My SQL Performance Schema My SQL Replication Using the My SQL Yum Repository My SQL Restrictions and Limitations Security in My SQL My SQL and Solaris Building My SQL from Source Starting and Stopping My SQL My SQL Tutorial My SQL and Windows My SQL NDB Cluster 7.5 My SQL 5.7 Secure Deployment Guide If you are searching for literal parentheses, you have to enclose each parenthesis in brackets; otherwise, my SQL thinks they're part of the regular expression syntax.

For example, I needed to find all the ID attributes in some HTML.

I tried escaping single and double-quotes for about 30 seconds, then I just switched to this: SELECT * FROM site WHERE html REGEXP "id=.apostrophe.][.quotation-mark."; Ta da. 0work right only when collate is _cs and NOT _ci (case insensitive)created tables eg.

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This section does not contain all the details that can be found in Henry Spencer's To use a literal instance of a special character in a regular expression, precede it by two backslash (\) characters.The My SQL parser interprets one of the backslashes, and the regular expression library interprets the other.For example, to match the string PDF (US Ltr) - 38.4Mb PDF (A4) - 38.4Mb PDF (RPM) - 37.7Mb HTML Download (TGZ) - 10.3Mb HTML Download (Zip) - 10.3Mb HTML Download (RPM) - 9.0Mb Man Pages (TGZ) - 197.5Kb Man Pages (Zip) - 306.1Kb Info (Gzip) - 3.5Mb Info (Zip) - 3.5Mb My SQL Backup and Recovery My SQL Globalization My SQL Information Schema My SQL Installation Guide My SQL and Linux/Unix My SQL and OS X My SQL Partitioning My SQL Performance Schema My SQL Replication Using the My SQL Yum Repository My SQL Restrictions and Limitations Security in My SQL My SQL and Solaris Building My SQL from Source Starting and Stopping My SQL My SQL Tutorial My SQL and Windows My SQL NDB Cluster 7.5 My SQL 5.7 Secure Deployment Guide If you are searching for literal parentheses, you have to enclose each parenthesis in brackets; otherwise, my SQL thinks they're part of the regular expression syntax.For example, I needed to find all the ID attributes in some HTML.I tried escaping single and double-quotes for about 30 seconds, then I just switched to this: SELECT * FROM site WHERE html REGEXP "id=.apostrophe.][.quotation-mark.archives.apostrophe.][.quotation-mark."; Ta da. 0work right only when collate is _cs and NOT _ci (case insensitive)created tables eg.

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